Category Archives: Dubai Therapy

The World is your gym and you are already a member.

Hypnosis Health Clinics Leicester UK; Dubai UAE

Whats your excuse not to work out? We can make all the excuses we like but really there is no excuse that will justify you not being fit and healthy. Keep fit doesn’t mean endless mind numbing hours at the gym, do something you enjoy like a social sport like tennis or roam the countryside on your bicycle, it should be something you enjoy  and not a chore.

I workout outdoors where ever possible, the scenery is ever changing and the fresh air makes a world of difference. I also travel a lot so belonging to any gym doesn’t work out for me. You don’t have to splash out on any expensive equipment either and nowadays a lot of exercise routines and advice are available online, to keep you motivated and give you something different every time.

Below is one of the workouts I enjoy doing and I like it because unlike lots of ab work, you can stand and do it, which is great when I am on my travels and space is tight. Tiffany has lots of mini workouts online great for women so give it a go! See what you think and you can put something together for yourself that you really enjoy.

‘The World is your gym and you are already a member’

Good luck, Shelly

Employee Assistance Schemes

Hypnosis Health Clinic Leicester UK; Dubai UAE

Do you know that if you or your employers pay into the scheme Paycare or any other relevant schemes they will contribute towards your therapy with me?

As I belong to the UK’s respected therapy bodies setting high standards of therapy recognised worldwide I fit the criteria set by Paycare and schemes enabling you to get specific therapeutic support.

  • BACP – British Assoc of Consellors & Psychotherapy
  • GHR – General Hypnotherapy Register
  • CNHC – Complementary National Healthcare Council
  • I am also a registered Bupa Mental Health Therapist.

Call me freephone 0800 612 8159 to see how I can get you on your road to freedom and success or email leicstherapy@gmail.com

Free Initial Assessment and Consultation

Hypnosis Health Clinics Leicester UK; Dubai UAE

You may have been living, trying to cope, or manage with a troubling issue for some time now.

Or you may have been looking for positive re enforcement with coaching support or therapy that can enhance your life like confidence building or sports performance.

You have a look around at various therapies that are available to you, whether this includes visiting your doctor, attending managed groups for people with similar issues or reading up online. How ever you do your research, it can be a tiring  and confusing task, how do you really know what will work for you?

If you have been considering counselling or hypnotherapy for your anxieties, phobias, to stop smoking, to lose weight or any other issues you need to start somewhere and be comfortable with your decision, that its right for you.

I offer a free, no obligation telephone consultation prior to doing any work with you. This is important as we both need to find out more about each other and the issues that have been bothering you.  I can inform you of whether I am honestly suitable for your requirements and how the process will work should we go ahead.

It’s often a massive relief to new clients being able to unburden themselves confidentially to someone who is calm and understanding to your predicament and I would urge you not to suffer in silence. Please do call or email me, with no obligation, to see if I can help you, you do not need to suffer any longer on your own.

To book a free telephone assessment please call me

  • Freephone UK 0800 612 8159 If I miss your call please leave me your name and telephone number and I will get right back to you
  • Dubai UAE please email me for Skype call information
  • Or Email leicstherapy@gmail to enquire and book your telephone consultation.

I look forward to hearing from you soon. Regards,

Shelly

How to Keep Healthy During Ramadan

Ramadan is a spiritual month in the Islamic calendar where Muslims from around the globe all come together and fast. This is to abstain from all food and drink during sunlight hours.

Fasting is intended to help teach Muslims self-discipline, self-restraint and generosity. It also reminds them of the suffering of the poor, who may rarely get to eat well.

It is common to have one meal (known as the suhoor), just before sunrise and another (known as the iftar), directly after sunset.

Because Ramadan is a time to spend with friends and family, the fast will often be broken by different Muslim families coming together to share in an evening meal.

Depending on where you are in the world, will determine how long your fast will be, ie; how long in between sunrise and sunset. The climate you are in will make a big difference as well, in hot countries such as Dubai you need to be particularly careful to keep from dehydrating in the strong heat.

Fasting is also an excellent time to give up smoking, as you cannot smoke for the majority of the day it is the perfect opportunity to quit smoking easily and for good.

What about your health during Ramadan?

Fasting can be good for your health as long as it is done correctly. When the body is starved of food, it starts to burn fat so that it can make energy. This can lead to weight loss. However, if you fast for too long your body will eventually start breaking down muscle protein for energy, which is unhealthy.

Dr Razeen Mahroof, an anaesthetist from Oxford, says there’s a strong relationship between diet and health.

“Ramadan isn’t always thought of as being an opportunity to lose weight because the spiritual aspect is emphasised more generally than the health aspect,” he says. “However, it’s a great chance to get the physical benefits as well.”

Source of energy

The changes that happen in the body during a fast depend on the length of the continuous fast. The body enters into a fasting state eight hours or so after the last meal, when the gut finishes absorbing nutrients from the food.

In the normal state, body glucose, which is stored in the liver and muscles, is the body’s main source of energy. During a fast, this store of glucose is used up first to provide energy. Later in the fast, once the glucose runs out, fat becomes the next source of energy for the body.

With a prolonged fast of many days or weeks, the body starts using protein for energy.

This is the technical description of what is commonly known as ‘starvation’. It is clearly unhealthy. It involves protein being released from the breakdown of muscle, which is why people who starve look very thin and become very weak.

However, you are unlikely to reach the starvation stage during Ramadan because the fast is broken daily.

Gentle transition

As the Ramadan fast only lasts from dawn till dusk, the body’s energy can be replaced in the pre-dawn and dusk meals.

This provides a gentle transition from using glucose to fat as the main source of energy, and prevents the breakdown of muscle for protein.

Dr Mahroof says the use of fat for energy helps weight loss. It preserves the muscles and eventually reduces your cholesterol level. In addition, weight loss results in better control of diabetes and reduces blood pressure.

“A detoxification process also occurs, because any toxins stored in the body’s fat are dissolved and removed from the body,” says Dr Mahroof.

After a few days of the fast, higher levels of endorphins appear in the blood, making you more alert and giving an overall feeling of general mental wellbeing.

A balanced food and fluid intake is important between fasts. The kidneys are very efficient at maintaining the body’s water and salts, such as sodium and potassium. However, these can be lost through perspiration.

To prevent muscle breakdown, meals must contain enough energy food, such as carbohydrates and some fat.

“The way to approach your diet during fasting is similar to the way you should be eating outside Ramadan,” says Dr Mahroof. “You should have a balanced diet with the right proportion of carbs, fat and protein.” (NHS UK)

Practical tips to keep healthy during Ramadan 2012

  • Stay hydrated. Because our body is mostly water, the best source of fluid replacement is pure water. Aim to drink enough water at night to avoid dehydration and headaches during the day.
  • Eat well to stay healthy. Start gently and break your fast with dates, water or milk. After a long period of fasting, you need to bring your fluids and blood sugar level up without overloading your body. Have some fruit and nuts to get your digestion system gently going. Resist deep fried food such as samosa’s, chips and heavy savoury pastries.
  • Eat slowly and don’t overdo it. The longer we chew our food, the less work our digestive track needs to do and we absorb more nutrients. During Ramadan the digestive system isn’t being used, so remember to not overburden it.
  • Exercise when you can. It is important for your circulation to maintain some kind of exercise. Get into the habit of going for an evening walk, or just to get some fresh air. Fresh air is important for your body and it will also help you to sleep well.
  • Sleep well. A good sleep is necessary to ensure balance the next day especially for those who go to work. Lack of sleep can express itself in the form of nervousness, bad headaches and digestive problems.

For more information, get the Dept of Health Guidelines for Ramadan here.

In Muslim countries such as Dubai, it is important that all non Muslims respect the month of Ramadan, which means adopting certain rules in public during daylight hours. Read the ExPat Woman Ramadan Guide here.

Wishing everyone a peaceful, happy Ramadan 2012. Shelly 🙂

Do You Feel Hungry All The Time?

5 ways to turn off your hunger switch

GNC, GNC LiveWell, health, nutrition, exercise, vitamins, hunger, hunger, protein, fibre

Leicester Therapy Centre

What if curbing your appetite were as easy as turning off the lights? It is when you use your brain – not your stomach – to feel full.

Wouldn’t it be great to have your cake, eat it too – and still lose weight? You can as long as your brain is getting the message that you’re satisfied after a few delicious bites. The trouble happens when your brain doesn’t get the “I’m full” message and tells your body it’s still hungry. Sure, there’s always will power. But when you’re fighting your brain chemistry, it’s never a fair fight.

Research reveals that it’s your brain—not your stomach—that is Command Central for weight management. “It’s the single most exciting breakthrough in weight management in the last 10-plus years, and yet, no one is talking about it,” says Doug Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., F.A.C.N., director of the Phase I Clinical Research unit of Miami Research Associates, a research site that’s been part of some of the biggest health breakthroughs in the past 25 years.

After years of seeing less than satisfying results with gut-based diet systems, scientists started looking at the brain for answers. The breakthrough came when researchers finally discovered that the brain uses a type of messaging system – think of it as “texting”- to determine when and what to eat, and when you’re hungry and when you’re not.

“This understanding of what was always considered a very complex science now allows people to take a simple approach to weight management that doesn’t ask them to change their lifestyle,” says Kalman. “It’s something everyone can do.” When used in tandem with smart eating and exercise, bolstering your personal will power with a brain that’s also on board can boost weight-loss goals big time. Here are five simple strategies to help you get started!

1 Fill Up on Fibre and Water
Fibre and water trigger feelings of fullness and reduce hunger by sending a “YOU’RE FULL!” text to the brain. In fact, researchers at Penn State found that when people consumed a small or moderate amount of a fibre-rich liquid 15 minutes before a meal, it markedly reduced caloric intake (by 20%).

Have a cup of clear soup with veggies 15 minutes before a meal. No time to prepare soup? Drink a fibre supplement stirred into a glass of water for a similar effect.

2 Get a Good Night’s Sleep
People who get inadequate sleep, that is, six hours or less per night, have increased amounts of the hormone ghrelin when they wake up the next morning, says Christopher Nolte, M.D., a neurologist who holds certifications from both The American Board of Sleep Medicine and The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Think of ghrelin as the text that the stomach sends to the brain, saying it needs food. “When the brain gets the message, it texts back, ‘OK, let’s eat,’ and you typically go looking for carbs,” says Nolte. “The reality is, you don’t need to eat carbs right then, despite what your brain is telling you.”

 “Allow yourself seven hours or  more of sleep,” says Nolte. And when you get the carb cravings, have water or a cup of green tea instead.

3 Punch Up Your Polyphenols
Green teas, along with other polyphenol rich foods (most notably those with high levels of two types of polyphenols—anthocyanins and stilbenes) have been shown to be very good at turning off the hunger switch. Stilbenes are found in grapes, blueberries and cranberries. The best-known stilbene is the anti-ageing compound resveratrol, most notably found in red grapes and red wine. Anthocyanins are present in popular superfruits such as acai berries, bilberries and blueberries. In a study published in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture found that purified berry anthocyanins normalized the fat levels in mice that were fed a high-fat diet. Scientists attribute this effect to the ability of anthocyanins to assist cells in burning energy, inducing satiety and, ultimately, turning off the hunger switch.

Increase your intake of green tea and berries.

4 Don’t Buy These 
Some ingredients turn on your hunger switch, so it pays to read labels. Some of the worst offenders: high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and palmitic acid (the main fat in palm oil, palm kernel oil and a saturated fat in beef). These troublemakers stop the hormones leptin and insulin, two of the brain’s most important “hunger messengers,” from reaching Command Central. When leptin and insulin are blocked from the brain, the brain tells you to keep eating, which can mean the difference between having a few chips and eating half the bag. In fact, in a study published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas found that palmitic acid’s ability to block leptin and insulin was so great that it may accelerate both obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

Avoid processed foods which may contain these offenders and choose whole, fresh, unadulterated foods. Shop the perimeter of your supermarket, where the least processed foods are found. Reduce your intake of beef and opt for “grass-fed” beef, which naturally contains less of the problematic saturated fat.

5 Power up Your Protein
While increasing your consumption of protein can satiate your appetite, one of protein’s building blocks, namely the amino acid tyrosine works as a neurotransmitter, speeding up messages to the brain that turn off the desire for food. That means with tyrosine, whether in food or supplements, cravings end faster and fewer calories are consumed.

In addition, protein will turn off your hunger switch to a greater extent than carbohydrates or fat, so replacing some carbs with protein may help to reduce your overall caloric intake. Eat a minimum of 20g of protein at each main meal.

Hypnosis Health Dubai Launches Oct 2012

Hypnosis Health Dubai

I’m very pleased to announce that Hypnosis Health Dubai launches October 2012 at the prestigious Holistic Institute at Jumeirah Lake Towers, Dubai UAE.

All counselling and hypnotherapy services will be available to you, please email any advance queries to leicstherapy@gmail.com Skype calls are available too.

Look forward to hearing from you soon. Shelly